Healthcare Reputation Management: 7 Tricks to Do First

Staying on top of what people are saying or writing about you is about more than ego. It helps you amplify the positive and quickly resolve anything negative—before it blows up.

Healthcare providers face a unique challenge when it comes to their reputations. How current and future patients view you can mean the difference between a full appointment calendar or an empty lobby. A single negative post on social media can torpedo your hard-earned reputation, even if what is written is untrue.

You need good reputation management habits to stay on top of your healthcare reputation. You also need to do it in a way that is safe and reliable. Start with these seven reputation management tricks before trying any others.

1. Claim Your Profile on All Review Sites

There are a lot of review sites out there, and claiming your profile on all of them can seem like a daunting task. But an unclaimed profile means you’re not tracking what is said about you on that site. It also gives the appearance that you just don’t care.

It’s important that you claim your profiles, especially on the big mainstream sites like Google My Business and Yelp. These are resources that most people go to first when considering who they want to work with. Great reviews on these sites get them past the first hurdle of considering you. Bad reviews have them moving along to the next option.

For healthcare professionals, there are a slew of medical-specific review sites to monitor, too. Vitals, HealthGrade, RateMDs, ZocDoc, and RealSelf are some of the most popular sites. Choosing a healthcare provider is a complicated thing to do for most people. Future patients dig deep into sites like these to find out all they can before choosing a new healthcare practitioner.

Ignore your…

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How Tagging Strategies Transform Marketing Campaigns

As a marketer, I understand how today’s marketing campaigns face fierce competition. With so much content and ads competing for eyeballs, creating campaigns that stand out is no easy task. 

That’s where strategies like tagging come in. 

It helps you categorize and optimize your marketing efforts. It also helps your campaigns cut through the noise and reach the right audience.

To help you out, I’ve compiled nine ways brands use a tagging strategy to create an impactful marketing campaign. 

Let’s get to it. 

How Brands Use a Tagging Strategy

Tagging involves using keywords or labels to categorize and organize content, products, or customer data. You attach tags to specific items or information to make searching, sorting, and analyzing data easier. 

There are various types of tags, including meta tags, analytics tags, image tags, hashtags, blog tags, and more. 

So, how do brands use a tagging strategy to make their marketing campaigns stand out?

Improve Social Media Engagement

With over 5 billion users, social media provides an easy way to connect with your audience, build relationships, and promote your offerings.

Use a tagging strategy to boost social media interactions. Consistently use hashtags that align with current trends and topics. This encourages people to interact with your content and boosts content visibility.

You can also use tags to monitor brand mentions of your products or your industry. This allows you to engage with your audience promptly.

Consider virtual social media assistants to streamline your tagging strategy. These AI-driven tools can suggest relevant hashtags, track mentions, and automate responses. Implementing them can save time and resources while ensuring consistent engagement across your socials.

Build a Personal Brand on LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional networking platform, with over 1 billion members across 200 nations. It offers excellent opportunities for individuals and businesses to build and nurture their brands.

However, simply creating a professional profile isn’t enough to build a personal brand on LinkedIn

Use various tags to increase your visibility, establish thought leadership, showcase expertise, and attract the right connections. For instance, use skill tags to showcase your expertise and industry tags to attract connections and opportunities within your industry. Use certification tags to help showcase your expertise and credibility to potential employers or clients. 

Facilitate Customer Segmentation and Personalization

Personalization matters—more so in today’s data-driven world. In fact, 65% of consumers expect your brand to adapt to their changing preferences and needs.

To meet this expectation, consider using a tagging strategy.

Segment your customers based on shared characteristics, such as demographics, interests, purchase history, cart abandonment, and behavior.

Here’s a summary of the steps to customer segmentation.

With your customer segments ready, use…

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Unlock Your Brain’s Hidden Potential With This Simple Nature Hack (M)

The wisdom of naturalists like Thoreau validated by science as researchers unveil the mental benefits of nature immersion.

The wisdom of naturalists like Thoreau validated by science as researchers unveil the mental benefits of nature immersion.

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Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks. View all posts by Jeremy Dean



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4 Ways “No” Moves You Forward

4 Ways “No” Moves You Forward

“We took our idea [for the computer] to a few companies, one where Woz worked [Hewlett-Packard] and one where I worked at the time [Atari]. Neither one was interested in pursuing it, so we started our own company.” Steve Jobs

Apple Computer started after Atari and HP said, “No.” It’s dumb to desire rejection. but imagine what might not have happened if Hewlett-Packard said yes.

Apple Computer started after Atari and HP said,

“No” moves you forward when:

#1. It clarifies motivation.

“The reason we [Woz and I] built a computer is that we wanted one, and we couldn’t afford to buy one.” Steve Jobs

Jobs and Woz did what they wanted to do.

Pressures at work cause forgetfulness. You lose motivation when you forget what you want to do. Even if you don’t like work, it’s good to remember it’s fulfilling to provide for people you love.

Sometimes you don’t know what you want until you can’t have it.

#2. It eliminates possibilities.

I love options, but the easiest way to move forward is to have only one path to follow.

Possibilities paralyze people. Skilled sales people give you either/or decisions. Do you prefer X or Y? Jobs and Woz started Apple because other options didn’t work.

“The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.” Warren Buffett

#3. It prompts innovation.

People tell you what won’t work. Innovation begins when you say, “But what might work?”

Rejection is redirection.

#4. It ignites learning.

Knowers don’t learn. Learning begins with, “I don’t know.” Sometimes when people say, “I don’t know,” I say, “But if you did know…”

A closed door is an invitation to learn.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” Winston Churchill

What are some advantages to rejection?

What are the best ways to respond to a door closing?

Still curious:

3 Ways to Respond to Failure: Get a Bigger Nail

How to Face Resistance to Your Great Ideas

I invite you to check out our book, The Vagrant.

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How To Reduce Your Worry In Only 10 Minutes

Escape from worries about past and future and find it easier to focus on the present moment.

Escape from worries about past and future and find it easier to focus on the present moment.

Just ten minutes of mindfulness each day is effective against repetitive anxious thoughts, research reveals.

The practice can also help stop your mind from wandering.

People in the study who meditated for only a short period found it easier to focus on their present-moment external experience rather than their internal thoughts.

Mr Mengran Xu, the study’s first author, said:

“Our results indicate that mindfulness training may have protective effects on mind wandering for anxious individuals.

We also found that meditation practice appears to help anxious people to shift their attention from their own internal worries to the present-moment external world, which enables better focus on a task at hand.”

82 participants in the study either did 10 minutes meditation or listened to an audio story.

Those who meditated were better able to stay focused on a subsequent task they were given.

Mr Xu said:

“Mind wandering accounts for nearly half of any person’s daily stream of consciousness.

For people with anxiety, repetitive off-task thoughts can negatively affect their ability to learn, to complete tasks, or even function safely.

It would be interesting to see what the impacts would be if mindful meditation was practiced by anxious populations more widely.”

Studies have also found that mindfulness meditation has many benefits, including reducing depression and painaccelerating cognitionincreasing creativitydebiasing the mind and much more.

The study was published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition (Xu et al., 2017).

Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks. View all posts by Jeremy Dean

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How to Build Relationships with the Right People

How to Build Relationships with the Right People

The Gant Study on human development is in the second generation of participants. It began in 1938. Good genes aren’t the answer to the good life. Neither is working out, a good diet, or a great job.

The answer to the good life is supportive relationships.

The relationships you enjoy begin with you.

How to build relationships with the right people:

Identify the right people

Choose travel partners carefully. Jim Rohn said, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.”

Choose people who…

  1. Challenge you. Look for people who expand your life.
  2. Need your help. Giving to others makes you better.
  3. Can do things you can’t.
  4. Do something remarkable or who aspire to do something remarkable.
  5. Work outside your organization. Use technology to connect. Move beyond transactions.

Choose character

People often have an outstanding character quality. Some are kind. Others look you in the eye and say what they see without flinching.

You need a doer, a dreamer, and a feeler in your life. Doers know how to get things done. They’re systematic and finish what they start. Dreamers love “we could.” Feelers have tender hearts.

How relationships begin

Make an ask. You notice someone who excels where you aspire to excel. Say, “I notice you’re great at building relationships, what advice do you have for connecting with people?”

Another type of ask goes like this, “I could use your help.” Be specific. Don’t ask for a life-long commitment.

An ask reveals a person’s character. Generous people build richer relationships than skinflints.

Make an offer. “I notice you’re working to …. I’d like to learn more.” In the process of learning more you might find ways to be helpful. Don’t send an email saying, “I think I can help you,” but show up to help.

How could you build relationships today?

What advice do you have on this topic?

Still curious:

My Best Relationship Advice for Leaders

A Simple Approach to Relationship Building

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Deadly Groupthink: Mafia Study Reveals The Dark Side Of Social Pressure (M)

The chilling truth about how group pressure fuels violence in the mafia.

The chilling truth about how group pressure fuels violence in the mafia.

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Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks. View all posts by Jeremy Dean



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The Personality Trait That Lowers Dementia Risk

The trait may encourage people to keep their mind active, which is a protective factor against dementia.

The trait may encourage people to keep their mind active, which is a protective factor against dementia.

People who are open to experience have a lower risk of developing dementia, research finds.

People who are open to experience are more likely to be imaginative, sensitive to their feelings, intellectually curious and seekers of variety.

Openness to experience is one of the five major aspects of personality.

Being more open to experience may encourage people to keep their mind active, which a protective factor against dementia.

People with higher openness to experience also tend to have higher levels of education, which also reduces dementia risk.

The second personality trait linked to dementia in the new study was neuroticism.

Being neurotic increased the risk of developing dementia by 6 percent, the researchers found.

The major personality trait of neuroticism involves a tendency towards worry and moodiness.

People who are neurotic are more likely to experience negative emotions like depression, anxiety, guilt and envy.

Other studies have found that being neurotic may double the risk of developing dementia later in life.

Neurotic people are particularly sensitive to chronic stress.

Personality, though, is not destiny, when it comes to dementia — good brain health is about nature and nurture.

Many factors can reduce the risk of developing dementia such as a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating properly and getting enough exercise.

Indeed, making four out of five critical lifestyle changes can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s by 60 percent.

Keeping the mind active is thought to be important for reducing the risk of dementia.

Learning new activities, travel and deepening social relationships may all be beneficial.

The present study included 524 people who were given tests of personality and symptoms of pre-dementia.

Ms Emmeline Ayers, the study’s first author, explained:

“While more studies are needed, our results provide evidence that personality traits play an independent role in the risk for or protection against specific pre-dementia syndromes.

From a clinical perspective, these findings emphasize the importance of accounting for aspects of personality when assessing for dementia risk.”

The study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Ayers et al., 2020).

Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks. View all posts by Jeremy Dean

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This Is How Long It Takes To Recover From Divorce And Breakups (M)

Researchers tracked over 200,000 people to reveal the hidden impact of breakups on mental health.

Researchers tracked over 200,000 people to reveal the hidden impact of breakups on mental health.

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Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks. View all posts by Jeremy Dean



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A Conversation with Glen Van Peski

A Conversation with Glen Van Peski

Glen wasn’t thrilled when I used the word obsessed.

Our conversation began, “You seem like a normal guy, but I think you’re obsessed.” Glen Van Peski’s book, “take less. do more,” reflects his drive to do things better.

When I asked, “Are you still counting the coffee beans you take on a hike?” Glen reached for a zippy bag with 8 beans in it. (See the video)

The whole thing started when he was “shlepping a pack that weighed over 70lbs,” on his first backpacking trip with his son, Brian. Glen is on a trip as I type this. His base pack weight is 5.6lbs. “Which is a little on the heavy side for me,” he said.

Be like bacon. Bacon makes everything better. Image of bacon on food.

Annoying:

“Always thinking about better ways to do things … can be frankly annoying to people.”

Unrequested advice feels like criticism. Soften obsession by competing with yourself. “I’m trying to optimize for me.”

Enough:

Glen strives to build margin in his life. Margin in time, money, and energy.

“More money is not going to change my lifestyle. It’s not going to make me happier.”

How much is enough?

A clear definition of success enables you to decide how much is enough.

Define your aspirations based on your definition of success.

Bacon and relationships:

On October 28, 2019, I wrote, “Be like bacon.” Over the years Glen has sent me bacon related items. A towel that says, “Bacon is basically the duct tape of food.” A bacon chocolate bar. Bacon lip balm. Bacon hot chocolate.

Bacon makes everything better.

“Getting things done that you want to get done is going to involve other people… you need to focus time and energy and attention on … building relationships…”

Click here to purchase Glen’s book: “take less. do more.

Special offer: If you send a picture of your receipt to glenvanpeski@gmail.com he will send a handwritten signature plate. Please include your name and mailing address.

Watch our interview for more insights from Glen Van Peski.

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