Depressed Eyes Are More Likely To Be This Colour

Depressed eyes are difficult if not impossible to spot, but this eye colour is linked to a seasonal form of depression.

Depression cannot be spotted in the eyes alone, however eye colour may provide certain clues.

That is because people with brown eyes are more likely to get depressed with the seasons, mostly in the winter, research finds.

Women with brown eyes are particularly at risk as women are 40 percent more likely to experience the condition than men.

Those with blue eyes, though, seem to be have a level of protection against what is known as Seasonally Affected Disorder (SAD).

People with SAD — a form of depression — generally start to feel down from around fall and the symptoms continue through the winter months.

SAD has also been linked to weight gain from a craving for carbs.

The study’s authors write:

“Individuals with blue eyes appear to have a degree of resilience to SAD.

This may be taken as suggestive that the blue eye mutation was selected as a protective factor from SAD as sub-populations of humans migrated to northern latitudes.”

Depressed eyes

In other words, people with blue eyes historically tended to live in the North so their genetic make-up is more resilient to the cold, dark winters.

Professor Lance Workman, study co-author, said:

“We know that light entering the brain causes a decrease in levels of melatonin.

As blue eyes allow more light into the brain, it may be that this leads to a greater reduction in melatonin during the day and this is why people with lighter eyes are less prone to SAD.”

The study’s results came from a survey of 175 students in Wales and Cyprus.

The researchers found that around 8 percent of people in their study had a chronic version of SAD, while 21 percent had a less serious version of it.

The study was presented at the annual conference of the British Psychological Society in Nottingham, United Kingdom (Workman et al., 2018).

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How to Build Courage And Bravery

Building courage and bravery can be done using personality traits, self-efficacy, hope, resilience, values, beliefs and social forces.

How does a fire-fighter feel so courageous they can enter a burning building?

How does an anxious person pluck up the courage to introduce themselves to a stranger?

How does a severely depressed individual find the bravery to go through the motions of another day?

All require courage, but this sort of bravery is an elusive quality.

In this article we look at the components that make up courage and how these can be developed.

Sean Hannah and colleagues from the United States Military Academy, writing in The Journal of Positive Psychology, provide a new model of courage (Hannah et al., 2007).

In it they set out a web of interrelated factors thought to feed into the subjective feeling of courage.

Broadly they suggest that levels of courage are influenced by character traits, particular states of mind and the values, beliefs and social forces acting on a person.

Alongside these factors set out below, I’ve provided suggestions for how each can be increased.

Courageous character traits

Firstly, then, the following three personality traits are thought important in being courageous:

1. The courageous are open to experience

This trait is associated with both divergent thinking, e.g. brainstorming, and the related idea of creativity.

Being courageous, then, is all about having options, and in order to generate those options you need to be creative.

How can it be increased?

Techniques which may help increase divergent thinking are brainstorming, keeping a journal, free writing and mind mapping.

Whether these will lead back into increased openness to experience, however, is unknown.

It’s unlikely to cause you any harm though!

2. The courageous are conscientious

The conscientious are dependable people who feel a sense of duty towards themselves and others.

They get the job done.

How can it be increased?

One way to increase conscientiousness may be to commit to more social institutions such as marriage, work, family or other role in the community.

This suggestion comes from research that has found conscientiousness increases with age, which is also associated with greater work, family and social commitments.

3. Core self-evaluation

These include traits like emotional stability and internal locus of control.

An internal locus of control refers to a feeling of control over situations.

How can it be increased?

Increasing locus of control can be achieved through cognitive therapy.

Central to cognitive therapy is the idea that our outlook on life is fundamentally affected by how we explain what happens to us and others – the attributions we use.

Changing these attributions can lead to changes in core self-evaluations.

Remember that these first three components are ‘traits’ meaning they are thought to be relatively stable across situations and across time-points.

While they can, and do change, they will be difficult to budge quickly or easily.

Courageous states of mind

The following four states of mind are, though, more open to adjustment and may be better bets for increasing courage in the moment:

1. Self-efficacy and confidence

Essentially means confidence in yourself and your ability to achieve desired outcomes.

How can it be increased?

Two important predictors of self-efficacy are firstly mastering a…

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New Year’s Resolutions: 10 Step Guide To Make Them Stick

Here is my quick ten-step guide to making those New Year’s resolutions, based on hundreds of psychology studies.

One of the main reasons that New Year’s resolutions are so often forgotten before January is out is that they frequently require habit change.

And habits, without the right techniques, are highly resistant to change.

But because habits work unconsciously and automatically, we can tap into our in-built autopilot to get the changes we want.

So here is my quick ten-step guide to making those New Year’s resolutions, based on hundreds of psychology studies.

1. For big results, think small

The classic mistake people make when choosing their New Year’s resolutions is to bite off more than they can chew.

Even with the help of psychologists, people find it hard to make relatively modest changes.

So pick something you have a reasonable chance of achieving.

You can always run the process again for another habit once the first is running smoothly.

2. Mental contrasting and New Year’s resolutions

Choosing what to change about yourself and sticking to it isn’t easy.

There is a method you can use, though, to help sort the good ideas from the bad, and to help boost your commitment.

Mental contrasting is described in more detail here but in essence it’s about contrasting the positive aspects of your change with the barriers and difficulties you’ll face.

This helps you to be more realistic about what is possible.

Research has found that following this procedure makes people more likely to give up on plans that are unrealistic but also commit more strongly to plans they can do.

3. Make a very specific ‘if-then’ plan

The types of plans for change people make spontaneously are vague: things like: “I will be a better person” or “This year I’ll get fit”.

These are fine as overall aims but it’s much better to make really specific plans that link situations with actions.

For example, you might say to yourself: “If I feel hungry between meals, then I will eat an apple.”

When repeated these types of actions will help you achieve your overall goals.

4. Repeat your New Year’s resolutions

Habits build up by repeating the same action in the same situation.

Each time you repeat it, the habit gets stronger.

The stronger it gets, the more likely you are to perform it without having to consciously will it.

So, how long will the habit take to form?

Well, it depends on both the habit you’ve chosen and your personality.

The idea that it’s always 21 days is demonstrably wrong.

5. Tweak your New Year’s resolutions

Everyone is different, so what works for one person might not work for another.

Habit change is no different. If your very specific plan seems to be going wrong after a while, or doesn’t feel right, then it may need a tweak.

Try a different time of the day or performing the habit in a different way.

Habit change needs self-experimentation.

Are there any tweaks to your environment you can make?

Those trying to change eating habits might try buying smaller plates, putting fruit on the counter and avoiding TV dinners.

6. Don’t suppress…

An odd thing happens when…

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Episode 1983 Scott Adams PART2: Our Next Mass Hysteria Is Long Covid. And Did Snopes Ruin America?

Episode 1983 Scott Adams PART2: Our Next Mass Hysteria Is Long Covid. And Did Snopes Ruin America?

Content:

  • Twitter Fauci Files
  • Rapid testing approval fraud?
  • Andrew Tate, medical situation
  • Snopes & President Biden
  • New weight loss pill for kids
  • Long COVID mass hysteria
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1984 Scott Adams PART1: Russian Disinformation, Classified Biden Documents, Snopes Fact-Fail, More

Episode 1984 Scott Adams PART1: Russian Disinformation, Classified Biden Documents, Snopes Fact-Fail, More

Content:

  • It depends how you define “refused”?
  • VP Biden had classified docs stored illegally?
  • Russia as an excuse for US bad behavior
  • Suggestions for President Trump’s campaign
  • Updated Ukraine prediction
  • Suggestions for President Putin
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1984 Scott Adams PART2: Russian Disinformation, Classified Biden Documents, Snopes Fact-Fail, More

Episode 1984 Scott Adams PART2: Russian Disinformation, Classified Biden Documents, Snopes Fact-Fail, More

Content:

  • It depends how you define “refused”?
  • VP Biden had classified docs stored illegally?
  • Russia as an excuse for US bad behavior
  • Suggestions for President Trump’s campaign
  • Updated Ukraine prediction
  • Suggestions for President Putin
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1985 Scott Adams PART1: Funny Antics Of Democrats Defending Biden’s Handling Secret Documents

Episode 1985 Scott Adams PART1: Funny Antics Of Democrats Defending Biden’s Handling Secret Documents

Content:

  • Shrinking attention span
  • Trump Org. CFO sentenced
  • FAA computers down
  • Biden’s classified docs at Penn
  • Stephan Collinson’s propaganda word choices
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1985 Scott Adams PART2: Funny Antics Of Democrats Defending Biden’s Handling Secret Documents

Episode 1985 Scott Adams PART2: Funny Antics Of Democrats Defending Biden’s Handling Secret Documents

Content:

  • Shrinking attention span
  • Trump Org. CFO sentenced
  • FAA computers down
  • Biden’s classified docs at Penn
  • Stephan Collinson’s propaganda word choices
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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The Best Pill To Lower Blood Pressure

This is the most effective pill to lower blood pressure, cholesterol and cut the risk of heart disease.

The ‘polypill’ is a new hope to cut heart attacks and strokes by a third, research finds.

The polypill is a once-daily pill with a combination of four different drugs at a low dosage.

Several studies have focused on the effect of the polypill and all suggest that the tablet can substantially reduce high blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

The polypill tablet contains two blood pressure lowering drugs, a blood-thinning drug and a cholesterol-lowering statin.

Currently, prescriptions for each individual drug are much higher than the polypills at a fixed dosage.

For example, cardiovascular-related drugs such as lisinopril is 10 mg, aspirin is 75 mg, atenolol is 50 mg, and simvastatin is 40 mg.

However, a daily polypill contains a lower dose of four medications used in preventing heart attack and stroke.

One study treated their patients with polypill made of three blood pressure lowering medications: 25 mg losartan, 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide, 2.5 mg amlodipine, and one cholesterol lowering drug: 10 mg atorvastatin.

Patients who were on the polypill saw a reduction of 9 mm Hg in their systolic blood pressure, whereas the usual care group patients only had a 2 mm Hg reduction in one year.

Also, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), known as “bad” cholesterol, in the polypill group dropped by 15 mg/dL compared to those in the usual care group who only had a reduction of 4 mg/dL.

The researchers points out that patients are naturally more likely to stick with a one-a-day pill rather than following procedures and routines for taking several medications at different times of day.

On top of that, it is more cost effective and it can be made available universally, making it cheaper for those with low socioeconomic status and in poorer countries.

Dr Munoz, the study’s first author, said:

“Patients face a variety of barriers to getting the care they need.

Those barriers can include cost and complexity of medication regimens, so innovative strategies are needed to improve the delivery of preventive care, especially when it comes to socio-economically vulnerable individuals.

When it comes to preventing cardiovascular disease, simple strategies like the polypill may offer key advantages for patients who face barriers to accessing medical care.

Simplicity is a big advantage of the polypill.

It’s once daily; easy to understand; and doesn’t require adjustment.

Patients are more likely to take their medications as prescribed, which is good for them and their frontline providers.”

The study was published in The New England Journal of Medicine (Munoz et al., 2019).

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Episode 1986 Scott Adams: Joe Biden’s Classified Documents, And All Manner Of Government Gaslighting

Episode 1986 Scott Adams: Joe Biden’s Classified Documents, And All Manner Of Government Gaslighting

Content:

  • Persuasive presentation of 911 events
  • Biden classified docs, 2nd batch found
  • Stephan Collinson on Biden classified docs
  • Gas stove gaslighting
  • Pfizer post-vax heart inflammation study
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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