Episode 1598 Scott Adams: Mass Formation Psychosis, The Great Reset, Manchin and More

Episode 1598 Scott Adams: Mass Formation Psychosis, The Great Reset, Manchin and More

Content:

  • Joe Manchin stops Biden’s BBB bill
  • Goldman Sachs not an honest player
  • President Biden’s Supreme Court packing play
  • No Agenda podcast hallucinates my opinion
  • Elon Musk will pay $11 Billion in taxes this year
  • Clay Travis on COVID and vaccines
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1599 Scott Adams: Help Me Save Jesse Watters From Being Rupared and More

Episode 1599 Scott Adams: Help Me Save Jesse Watters From Being Rupared and More

Content:

  • CNN Rupars Jesse Watters
  • 300% increase in Fentanyl border smuggling
  • Michael Cohen jailed for talking about his book?
  • J6 no bail uncharged, political prisoners
  • Hostage negotiating our way out of pandemic
  • VORB Score for each state
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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This Simple Technique Triples Weight Loss

This vital weight loss technique is nothing to do with diet and exercise.

Learning to love your body, however it looks, can triple weight loss efforts, research finds.

Dieters in the study learned to be less concerned about their size and weight and other people’s opinions of them.

They were also encouraged to think that how their body looks is not as important as they think.

Happily, the researchers found, people with an improved body image, automatically eat more healthily.

The study shows that hating your own body is one of the biggests barriers to weight loss.

It is well-known that people who are overweight often have body image problems.

Overcoming these problems — especially worrying about what other people think — is hugely beneficial to weight loss.

For the study, 239 overweight women followed a standard program of diet and exercise for one year.

Half were given a special course designed to improve their body image.

This included sessions on the emotional aspects of losing weight.

This is because some overweight people tend towards emotional eating.

Emotional eating means that negative moods trigger bouts of eating to feel better, rather than eating to satiate hunger.

The women were also encouraged to love their bodies, whatever its size and shape.

The results showed that those who improved their body image lost an average of 7 percent — more than triple the weight loss of the control group.

Dr Pedro Teixeira, study co-author, said:

“Body image problems are very common amongst overweight and obese people, often leading to comfort eating and more rigid eating patterns, and are obstacles to losing weight.

Our results showed a strong correlation between improvements in body image, especially in reducing anxiety about other people’s opinions, and positive changes in eating behavior.

From this we believe that learning to relate to your body in healthier ways is an important aspect of maintaining weight loss and should be addressed in every weight control program.”

The study was published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (Carraça et al., 2011).

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The 12 Psychology Studies of Christmas

How to have a happy Christmas according to psychology, the best type of chocolate, when gifts go wrong and more…

1. How to have a happy Christmas

We all want a happy Christmas (or cultural equivalent), but how do we get it?

This research into the psychology of happiness and Christmas suggests that a focus on spending and consumption is associated with less happiness while family and religious experiences are associated with more happiness.

Not exactly earth-shattering, but satisfying to quote to little Billy when he complains about his presents.

2. What’s the best type of chocolate?

Should we find ourselves unhappy at Christmas (shock! horror!), perhaps a little chocolate will help rectify the situation?

But what to choose for maximum pleasure: normal chocolate, milk chocolate or dark chocolate?

For the answer we turn to the Chocolate Happiness Undergoing More Pleasantness study.

That’s right, the CHUMP study.

It’s a real thing, and it’s a randomised controlled trial.

Unfortunately the results were inconclusive so you’ll be forced to conduct your own research.

3. The psychology of when gifts go wrong

Giving and receiving gifts can be a no-win situation.

We assume people close to us know us well enough to get us good gifts.

So, when a bad gift comes it tends to reflect poorly on the relationship.

However, men and women seem to have different psychological defence mechanisms for dealing with poor gifts: women pretend the gift is just what they’ve always wanted whereas men are more likely to say what they think.

And then the arguments start.

4. Don’t give money!

And talking of poor gifts, this study finds money is probably a bad gift perhaps because it can’t send a meaningful message about intimacy and tends to send the wrong message about status differences.

Perhaps that’s why it seems to be OK to give money to children, but not adults.

5. It’s all about the giving

As you know, Christmas is not about the getting, it’s all about the giving.

This neat research found that spending money on others promotes our own happiness better than spending money on ourselves.

6. What do your decorations say about you?

Research in Christmas psychology suggests that decorations on a home’s exterior make other people think you’re more sociable and perhaps more integrated with the community and with its social activities.

7. The smell of Christmas psychology

It’s the season of rampant commercialism and the shops have gone into overdrive.

Christmas music has been playing everywhere for months, but have you encountered any Christmas smells?

According to this study Christmas music interacts with Christmas scents to boost our attitudes to stores and increase our likelihood of visiting them.

I can’t help wondering what a ‘Christmas smell’ is though…

8. Good food is mostly in the mind

We all do a lot of eating at Christmas but does the chef get enough credit?

Brian Wansink, a food psychologist, describes all sorts of cool tricks for boosting people’s perceptions of the food they are eating.

It’s all about harnessing the ‘halo effect‘.

Leave parsley and chervil lying around, talk about the organic turkey…

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Episode 1600 Scott Adams: Let’s Make Fun of All the Stupid People in Charge Today

Episode 1600 Scott Adams: Let’s Make Fun of All the Stupid People in Charge Today

Content:

  • Is Mass Formation Psychosis, a professional diversion?
  • Dale explains need to panic over Omicron
  • Why “The News” can’t tell the truth about Omicron
  • Corruption, the biggest story of the pandemic
  • Biden’s clever anti-Trump suppression play
  • Omicron, safer than the vaccines?
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Why Christmas Rituals Make You Feel Happier

Study on rituals before eating reveals why they should be observed.

Every family has their Christmas rituals: it may be who hands out the presents, what songs are played or sung, what is watched on TV or where you sit at the table.

While these may all have special significance as making it your particular Christmas, are they just regular routines that have evolved over the years or do they have a psychological impact?

In fact, a study finds, rituals performed before eating or drinking can indeed enhance the pleasure we get (Vohs et al., 2013).

Professor Kathleen Vohs, who led the study said:

“Whenever I order an espresso, I take a sugar packet and shake it, open the packet and pour a teeny bit of sugar in, and then taste.

It’s never enough sugar, so I then pour about half of the packet in. The thing is, this isn’t a functional ritual, I should just skip right to pouring in half the packet.”

In the study some people were given very specific instructions for how they should eat a chocolate bar:

 “Without unwrapping the chocolate bar, break it in half.

Unwrap half of the bar and eat it.

Then, unwrap the other half and eat it.”

Compared with another group who ate the bar how they wanted, those who performed this ritual rated the chocolate more highly and savoured it more.

So perform all those Christmas rituals just as you always have: that way you’ll enjoy and savour it more.

And if your Christmas lunch is a little late, then take heart from the second part of the study, which found that a longer wait after the ritual and before eating increased the pleasure even more…

…even when people were only eating carrots!

Happy Holidays!

• Read on: The 12 Psychology Studies of Christmas

.

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This Humble Vegetable Reduces Heart Disease Risk

A vitamin found in this superfood can protect against heart disease by preventing cholesterol plaque build-up in the arteries.

Carrots are a humble vegetable, but in a way they are a superfood due to their richness in beta-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A.

Vitamin A is essential for the immune system, reproduction, skin and mucus membranes, eyes and healthy vision, and heart health.

Nevertheless our body needs an active enzyme to make vitamin A from carrots or any other food high in beta-carotene.

Beta-carotenes is converted to vitamin A with the help of an enzyme known as beta-carotene oxygenase 1 (BCO1).

The enzyme regulates the cholesterol circulation and is found in the intestine and the liver.

It has a high ability to choose beta-carotene for forming vitamin A and this conversion would lower “bad” cholesterol in the blood.

In this way, beta-carotene prevents atherosclerosis, which is narrowing of the arteries.

Atherosclerosis can lead to cardiovascular disease and heart attack, the biggest cause of death in the world.

Higher beta-carotene concentration has also been linked to a lower rate of metabolic syndrome, which is a combination of high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity.

However, due to genetic variations some people have more BCO1 activity and some less so these individuals need another source of vitamin A than beta-carotene.

Dr Jaume Amengual, the study’s first author, said:

“People who had a genetic variant associated with making the enzyme BCO1 more active had lower cholesterol in their blood.

That was our first observation. “

In their second study they looked into whether beta-carotene or vitamin A affects atherosclerosis.

Dr Amengual said:

“The main findings of the mice study reproduce what we found in humans.

We saw that when we give beta-carotene to mice, they have lower cholesterol levels.

These mice develop smaller atherosclerosis lesions, or plaques, in their arteries.

This means that mice fed beta-carotene are more protected against atherosclerosis than those fed a diet without this bioactive compound.

Moreover, the team tried to find out where in the body lipoproteins (particles that carry cholesterol in the blood) are produced.

Dr Amengual said:

“We narrow it down to the liver as the organ in charge of producing and secreting lipoproteins to the bloodstream, including those lipoproteins known as bad cholesterol.

We observed that in mice with high levels of vitamin A, the secretion of lipids into the bloodstream slows down.”

A high amount of beta-carotene in the blood normally would be beneficial to health.

However, there is a chance that BCO1 is not active enough therefore we can’t make vitamin A from eating high beta-carotene foods.

According to Dr Amengual, around 50 percent of the population have the enzyme with the less-active form.

Consequently, their body can’t produce enough vitamin A from plant-based foods so they need to get this vitamin from animal sources like cheese and milk.

The fist study was published in The Journal of Nutrition (Amengual et al., 2020) & the second study was published in the Journal of Lipid Research (Zhou et al., 2020).

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Episode 1601 Scott Adams: Watch Me Transform Bad News Into Good News Right in Front of You

Episode 1601 Scott Adams: Watch Me Transform Bad News Into Good News Right in Front of You

Content:

  • Omicron peaks, surges…no death surge?
  • COVID deaths were likely UNDERcounted
  • “Viral Blizzard” is a common pharma trick
  • 59% of voters, cheating likely affected 2020 election
  • J6 conspiracy charges?
  • Why we’re in the Golden Age
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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Episode 1602 Scott Adams: Are You Smart or Just Afraid? You Can’t Tell the Difference

Episode 1602 Scott Adams: Are You Smart or Just Afraid? You Can’t Tell the Difference

Content:

  • President Trump interviewed by Candace Owens
  • BMI and age relationship to vaxxx benefit
  • Sacrificing the young to benefit the old
  • Rapid test availability and corruption
  • Saving obese by sacrificing children and freedom
  • China Olympics safe?
  • If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topicsto build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure.

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The Psychology Of Poor Christmas Gifts And How They Affect Relationships

Men and women react quite differently in the short-term to receiving good and bad gifts.

Buying Christmas presents is hard work: hard on the feet, hard on the bank account and hard on the emotions.

Sometimes it feels like a lot of work for little reward.

Those nearest and dearest assume you know them well enough to buy a decent present, so that getting it wrong reflects badly on the relationship.

Psychological research on how gift-giving affects relationships hints at this no-win situation.

Studies suggest that good gifts only affirm similarity between couples, and so do little for the relationship.

Poor gifts, though, may lead people to question their similarity with each other, thereby damaging the relationship.

Studies tend to focus on how gifts affect perceived similarity because finding a ‘kindred spirit’ is thought central to successful relationships and reliably predicts relationship satisfaction (Murray et al., 2002).

But research by Elizabeth W. Dunn at the University of British Columbia and colleagues, published in the journal Social Cognition, suggests that men and women react quite differently in the short-term to receiving good and bad gifts (Dunn et al., 2008).

Gifts to strangers

To test their theories, Dunn and colleagues set up two experiments, each with a twist in their tail.

In the first experiment participants (students at the University of Virginia) were sat down to chat with a new opposite sex acquaintance for four minutes.

After this they were asked to select a gift for their new friend from a list of gift certificates for a variety of stores and restaurants.

The idea was that each participant then looked at the gift chosen for them and evaluated their perceived similarity with the other person.

Here’s the twist: before the experiment each participant had been asked to rank the gift certificates in the order they themselves would like to receive them.

Then the experimenters simply fed these preferences straight back to participants as though they had come from their new acquaintance.

Half the participants were told the other person had chosen their top choice, and the other half their last-but-one choice.

This created two conditions: those who got what they wanted and those who didn’t.

When the experimenters looked at the ratings of perceived similarity, the results showed a marked difference in how the men and women had reacted to good and bad gifts.

Men who got the gifts they wanted perceived themselves as more similar to the gift-giver, suggesting the better gift would have the expected positive effect on the relationship.

Women, though, seemed to be relatively unaffected by whether the present was good or bad.

This is a rather puzzling finding: shouldn’t good gifts also increase perceived similarity – and so liking – for women just as the men?

A possible solution to this puzzle emerged in the second experiment.

Gift-giving in established relationships

Instead of participants who hadn’t met before, the second experiment involved men and women who were already in (heterosexual) relationships.

Otherwise the experiment was almost identical, with the same twist that each received what they had indicated were their own best (or worst) gifts.

The only difference was…

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